The Making of a Photograph

"You don't make a photograph just with a camera," said Ansel Adams. "You bring to the act of photography all the pictures you have seen, the books you have read, the music you have heard, the people you have loved."

 "So I turned myself to face me, but I've never caught a glimpse of how the others must see the faker. I'm much too fast to take that test." - David Bowie, Changes.

"So I turned myself to face me, but I've never caught a glimpse of how the others must see the faker. I'm much too fast to take that test." - David Bowie, Changes.

In the promotional materials for my solo show I stress my background, not only in the art of photography, but in a wide range of subjects, mostly related to my job as a criminal defense investigator specializing in death penalty cases. My experiences shape not only how I view the world, but how I interpret that view and how I respond to that interpretation. All of that is reflected in what I choose to photograph, but it also informs everything else involved in the process: where I go to find my subjects, where I stand, how I compose the shot, the technical choices on shutter speed and lens aperture, when I squeeze the shutter release, and even what I say or do to put somebody at ease.

The camera is not an extension of my eye, it is an extension of everything that has gone into what makes me me. The resulting images are pieces of a puzzle, which when put together show who I am, stripped bare and vulnerable to the world.